A Family Assessment is an assessment of the safety and overall functioning of you and your family to guide recommendations for treatment and other intervention services. It typically includes the person served and caregivers (which may include biological parents, step-parents, or legal guardians) in the home.

Who Can Complete: A mental health practitioner (LIMHP, LMHP, Psychologist, etc) with training and experience in family dynamics and therapy. The practitioner may be associated with a family intervention such as IFP (Intensive Family Preservation).

What this evaluation should include:

  • Presenting Problem/Reason for Referral
  • Family Structure
  • Family History
  • Educational/Employment History of caregivers
  • Current Living Arrangements
  • Family Dynamics and Functioning
  • Household Rules and Structure
  • Safety Concerns
  • Family Mental Health/Substance Abuse History
  • Family Strengths/Assets
  • Concerns/Liabilities
  • Summary and Recommendations

When to refer:

  • When the concern is about the quality of family relationships and/or the adequate functioning of the family to protect and nurture children.

Summary: A Family Assessment is an assessment of the safety and overall functioning of you and your family to guide recommendations for treatment and other intervention services.

An Initial Diagnostic Interview (IDI)/Mental Status Exam (MSE) is a brief screening of a client’s mental functioning in the areas of affect, mood, and cognitive ability. May be used to identify specific psychological testing needs.

Who Can Complete: A psychologist, psychiatrist, or licensed independent mental health practitioner (LIMHP).

What this evaluation should include:

  • Screening of Client’s Mental Functioning
  • Risk Assessment regarding potential to hurt self and/or others
  • Diagnosis
  • Clinical formulation (the professional’s insight into your past and current strategies)
  • Future treatment recommendations

​Tips for your first visit:

  • So that you don’t forget, you may want to write down a list of symptoms you are struggling with.
  • Remember to be honest.
  • Bring along any medical or mental health records you feel would be helpful.
  • If you are anxious, it may help to ask a close friend or family member to come be a support for you.

When to refer:

  • Utilized with other assessments to determine appropriate diagnosis and treatment recommendations. Typically completed in conjunction with a Mental Health Evaluation.

Summary: An Initial Diagnostic Interview (IDI)/Mental Status Exam (MSE) is a brief screening of a client’s mental functioning in the areas of affect, mood, and cognitive ability.

Your Content Goes HereAn Integrated Substance Abuse and Mental Health Evaluation combines features of a Mental Health Evaluation and a Substance Abuse Evaluation. Increasingly, it has been seen the population of those with mental health disorders and those with substance abuse disorders overlap significantly.

Who Can Complete: A dually credentialed clinician who is either a Licensed Independent Mental Health Practitioner (LIMHP), a Licensed Mental Health Practitioner (LMHP), or a Provisionally Licensed Mental Health Practitioner (PLMHP) AND a provisionally or fully licensed alcohol and drug counselor (LADC or PLADC) with adequate training, education, and credentials.

What this evaluation should include:

  • Presenting Problems
  • Demographics
  • Medical History
  • Social/Work/School/Military history and functioning
  • Detailed substance use history (when it started, how it progressed and current status)
  • Legal history
  • Family and social history, including past and current exposure to violence/trauma
  • History and current mental health concerns
  • Past Treatment History
  • May include rating on ASAM criteria (American Society on Addiction Medicine)
  • Mental Status Observations including suicide or violence risk
  • Collateral information from referring party, family members, and other providers is ESSENTIAL to a good evaluation
  • Diagnosis
  • Clinical formulation (the professional’s insight into your past and current strategies)
  • Future treatment recommendations

​Tips for your first visit:

  • So that you don’t forget, you may want to write down a list of symptoms you are struggling with.
  • Remember to be honest.
  • If you are currently on prescription medications, it may be helpful to provide a list to the clinician.
  • Bring along any medical or mental health records you feel would be helpful.
  • If you are anxious, it may help to ask a close friend or family member to come be a support for you.

When to refer:

  • Whenever there are concerns of both a mental health and substance abuse disorder.

Summary: An Integrated Substance Abuse and Mental Health Evaluation combines features of a Mental Health Evaluation and a Substance Abuse Evaluation.

Your Content Goes HereA Mental Health Evaluation (also known as a Biopsychosocial Assessment [BPSA] or Pretreatment Assessment [PTA]) is a detailed interview of your presenting problems and symptoms, functioning, history, and treatment issues and needs. Typically completed in conjunction with an Initial Diagnostic Interview (IDI)/Mental Status Exam (MSE).

Who Can Complete: Typically conducted by a Licensed Mental Health Practitioner (LMHP) or Independent Mental Health Practitioner (LIMHP).

What this evaluation should include:

  • Presenting Problems
  • Demographics
  • Medical History
  • Social/Work/School/Military history and functioning
  • Detailed substance use history
  • Legal history
  • Family and social history, including past and current exposure to violence/trauma
  • History and current mental health concerns
  • Past Treatment History
  • Mental Status Observations including suicide or violence risk
  • Collateral information from referring party, family members, and other providers is ESSENTIAL to a good evaluation
  • Diagnosis
  • Clinical formulation (the professional’s insight into your past and current strategies)
  • Future treatment recommendations

​Tips for your first visit:

  • So that you don’t forget, you may want to write down a list of symptoms you are struggling with.
  • Remember to be honest.
  • Bring along any medical or mental health records you feel would be helpful.
  • If you are anxious, it may help to ask a close friend or family member to come be a support for you.

When to refer:

  • A Mental Health Evaluation is a logical starting point as a referral if there are any concerns abou